9 Must-Have Seminar Marketing Elements

By Jenny Hamby, the Seminar Marketing Pro™
Certified Guerrilla Marketer and Direct-Response Copywriter

Proving the value of your seminar to prospective attendees is one of the primary goals of your marketing materials. Most of my consultations with clients focus on how to prove value in their copy, such as by demonstrating how much money attendees will be able to save once they’ve learned the content of the seminar … or by comparing the cost of attending the seminar vs. paying for private consulting.

The goal is to help prospects see that they’re getting a fabulous bargain by attending your seminar. If they feel they’re getting more than they’re paying for, it’s easier to justify finding the money to pay their tuition. Plus, the idea of passing up a great deal makes many people incredibly uncomfortable — even if they know they really shouldn’t spend the time or money right now.

But adding value to your seminar comes with a warning for you — don’t overdo it. Offering too much of a bargain can be a red flag for many prospects, making them wonder why you’re so desperate for business. It might even make them wonder if your “seminar” is merely a thinly disguised sales pitch.

The second reason you don’t want to give away too much? You! You deserve a fair price for the knowledge and benefits you’re offering. It’s OK to give a discount, but you don’t have to be a doormat.

If you have a hard time recognizing and asking for a fair price for your services, try this:

  1. Compare your seminar with those offered by competitors. Compare how many hours of training you’re offering, the bonuses you’re offering, the personal guidance you’re providing, etc. Then compare tuition rates. If you’re offering the same length of seminar, but you’re offering free follow-up personal coaching, you’d probably be able to justify a higher price.
  2. Survey current clients and prospective attendees. Describe what the seminar will deliver — what they’ll learn, how they’ll benefit, and what they get. Then provide a choice of prices you’re considering and ask for their vote.
  3. Ask trusted advisors and colleagues who are familiar with your industry to review what you’re offering and give their opinion. Even if you don’t price your seminar as high as they recommend, you’ll gain enough confidence to raise your price a bit … which makes for a better win-win situation.
    Setting a price for your seminar registrations can make you squirm. However, utilizing these simple steps can help you feel a little more comfortable asking for – and receiving – the true worth of your seminar.

guerrilla-marketer Jenny Hamby is a Certified Guerrilla Marketer and direct-response copywriter who helps speakers, coaches and consultants fill seminar seats and make more money from their own seminars and workshops. Her on- and offline direct marketing campaigns have netted response rates as high as 84 percent … on budgets as small as $125. 

 

guerrilla-marketerJenny Hamby is a Certified Guerrilla Marketer and direct-response copywriter who helps speakers, coaches and consultants fill seminar seats and make more money from their own seminars and workshops. Her on- and offline direct marketing campaigns have netted response rates as high as 84 percent … on budgets as small as $125.

For 31 of her most powerful seminar marketing secrets, click here.